Researchers send brain-to-brain message from India to France

Science -

Researchers from around the world have been working on the ability for a person to share information with another person via brain-to-brain transmission without invasive surgery.

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Source: www.plosone.org
Source: www.plosone.org
In <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0105225" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a study published Sept. 3</a>, researchers said people in France and India transmitted information directly to the other's brain using electroencephalogry and electromagnetic induction. Electroencephalogry monitors brain signals from the outside, while electromagnetic induction stimulates the brain's visual cortex. Source: www.plosone.org

In a study published Sept. 3, researchers said people in France and India transmitted information directly to the other's brain using electroencephalogry and electromagnetic induction. Electroencephalogry monitors brain signals from the outside, while electromagnetic induction stimulates the brain's visual cortex.

"We wanted to find out if one could communicate directly between two people by reading out the brain activity from one person and injecting brain activity into the second person, and do so across great physical distances by leveraging existing communication pathways." Alvaro Pascual-Leone, study co-author

The information sent were the words "hola" and "ciao" in binary. Four people participated in the study: one person in India sent the information, and the other three people in France received it. The study was conducted by researchers from Harvard University along with experts from France and Spain.

In a separate study, researchers at the University of Washington said they had performed the first "noninvasive human-to-human brain interface" on Aug. 12, 2013. One researcher, Rajesh Rao, sent a signal via a thought for his colleague, Andrea Stocco, to flick his finger.

The Univ. of Washington researchers sat in separate rooms and wore caps that monitored electrical activity in the brain. Rao played a computer game in which he imagined pushing a button to fire a cannon while not moving any part of his body. At nearly the same time, Stocco moved his hand to mimic the button pushing motion.

A study published Nov. 6, 2013, details how Duke University researchers enabled two monkeys to move a set of virtual hands to touch objects on a screen. It is one of the first experiments in which thoughts controlled a pair of hands, and not just a single hand.

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