Egypt's new cabinet sworn in

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A new cabinet was sworn in under the leadership of Prime Minister Ibrahim Mehleb days after Hazem El-Beblawi and his entire cabinet resigned.

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Copyright 2014 Reuters
Copyright 2014 Reuters
Egypt's interim president appointed Ibrahim Mehleb, Egypt's housing minister, to form a new government on Feb. 25. Mehleb was a member of ousted president Hosni Mubarak's NDP party and head of a large construction firm. A day earlier, the prime minister submitted his and his cabinet's resignations. Copyright 2014 Reuters

Egypt's interim president appointed Ibrahim Mehleb, Egypt's housing minister, to form a new government on Feb. 25. Mehleb was a member of ousted president Hosni Mubarak's NDP party and head of a large construction firm. A day earlier, the prime minister submitted his and his cabinet's resignations.

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Mehleb's new cabinet was sworn in on March 1. As expected, prospective presidential candidate Abdul Fatah Al-Sisi was reconfirmed as defense minister. Most of the ministers were holdovers from the previous cabinet.

Although Egypt's constitution makes the president the commander of the armed forces, a decree by interim President Adly Mansour on Feb. 27 removed the executive as head of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. The move gave further autonomy to the military, which is already shielded from civilian oversight.

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Egyptian military chief Abdul Fattah Al-Sisi said Jan. 11 in the state-run Al-Ahram newspaper that he may run for the country's presidency, but "there must be a popular demand." Al-Sisi would have to step down as defense minister and run as a civilian. Most parties are waiting for other candidates to make an endorsement. CC BY-ND WikiCommons

Egyptian military chief Abdul Fattah Al-Sisi said Jan. 11 in the state-run Al-Ahram newspaper that he may run for the country's presidency, but "there must be a popular demand." Al-Sisi would have to step down as defense minister and run as a civilian. Most parties are waiting for other candidates to make an endorsement.

The final tally of votes on Jan. 14-15 for Egypt's constitution was 98.1% in favor. Nationwide turnout was 38.6%, which was higher than the 2012 referendum in which 30% voted. The results were largely viewed as an endorsement for military chief General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to run for president. Copyright 2014 Reuters

The final tally of votes on Jan. 14-15 for Egypt's constitution was 98.1% in favor. Nationwide turnout was 38.6%, which was higher than the 2012 referendum in which 30% voted. The results were largely viewed as an endorsement for military chief General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to run for president.

Egypt's currency traded at 6.96 pounds to the dollar on Feb. 4, a decrease of about 11% from the previous year. It has declined since the 2011 uprising, before which it traded around 5.8 to the dollar. The Central Bank has held extraordinary auctions to prop up the currency, but a black market persists.

Egyptian authorities have arrested at least 21,317 people since the ouster of former President Mohamed Morsi on July 3, the blog Wiki Thawra (Wiki Revolution) said Jan. 9. Some 16,387 were arrested during political events, and nearly 2,600 were Muslim Brotherhood figures.

Thirteen people were killed Jan. 3, 2014, as supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood clashed with police across Egypt. Supporters had been holding daily demonstrations since the government declared it a terrorist organization a week earlier. By March, the frequency of protests had diminished. Copyright 2014 Reuters

Thirteen people were killed Jan. 3, 2014, as supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood clashed with police across Egypt. Supporters had been holding daily demonstrations since the government declared it a terrorist organization a week earlier. By March, the frequency of protests had diminished.

A state of emergency was declared in Aug. 2013 after security forces violently cleared two sit-ins of supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, killing 638 and injuring nearly 4,000. It was the worst day of violence in Egypt since the 2011 uprising. The state of emergency ended in Nov. 2013. Copyright 2014 Reuters

A state of emergency was declared in Aug. 2013 after security forces violently cleared two sit-ins of supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, killing 638 and injuring nearly 4,000. It was the worst day of violence in Egypt since the 2011 uprising. The state of emergency ended in Nov. 2013.

The Muslim Brotherhood lost an appeal on Nov. 6 to the Sept. 23 ban on all its activities in Egypt. The decision included the seizure of the group's "money, assets and buildings." Several prominent members have been arrested or barred from traveling.

On the one-year anniversary of Mohamed Morsi's election, millions of demonstrators rallied across Egypt in June 2013, calling for his resignation and for early elections. The protests were likely larger than any during the 2011 revolution. Military chief Abdul Fattah al-Sisi announced July 3, 2013, that Morsi was no longer president. Copyright 2014 Reuters

On the one-year anniversary of Mohamed Morsi's election, millions of demonstrators rallied across Egypt in June 2013, calling for his resignation and for early elections. The protests were likely larger than any during the 2011 revolution. Military chief Abdul Fattah al-Sisi announced July 3, 2013, that Morsi was no longer president.

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