'Cache' of Atari video games discovered in New Mexico landfill

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The discovery of an unspecified number of Atari video game cartridges buried in a New Mexico landfill is being turned into a documentary.

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Copyright 2014 Reuters
Copyright 2014 Reuters

Alamogordo Landfill

Workers discovered an unspecified number of unsold Atari video game cartridges -- notably among them the 1983 video game "E.T." -- in a southern New Mexico landfill. Microsoft is producing a documentary on the excavation tentatively titled "Atari: Game Over" that will debut on Xbox Live later this year.

While the number of cartridges buried in the landfill has not yet been revealed, <a href="http://www.ign.com/articles/2014/04/26/the-dig-uncovering-the-atari-et-games-buried-in-new-mexico-desert" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">one worker on the scene</a> said there was a "whole hell of a lot more games down there." Source: twitter.com

While the number of cartridges buried in the landfill has not yet been revealed, one worker on the scene said there was a "whole hell of a lot more games down there."

"We're just watching like everybody else." Kristen Keller, Atari spokeswoman

Atari, which has changed ownership several times over the years, claimed to have no "corporate knowledge" of the landfill. The New York Times in September 1983 said that the company dumped 14 trucks' worth of video game cartridges in the landfill.

Incorporated in 1972, Atari is widely credited with popularizing video games in the U.S. The company also played a major role in the 1983 video game crash. Following Atari's demise, video games were largely marginalized in the U.S. until the release of the Nintendo Entertainment System (pictured) in 1985.

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