Family loses dog during Sandy, finds him at pet shelter 18 months later

U.S. -

Hundreds of pets on the East Coast have been reunited with their owners after being separated by Hurricane Sandy.

Get
Circa News
Source: www.facebook.com
Source: www.facebook.com

Chuck James and his family lost their dog Reckless during Hurricane Sandy in Oct. 2012. A year and a half later, James and his wife went to a local shelter to find a new dog for their daughter's birthday. The first dog the adoption counselor brought out was Reckless, who had survived the storm.

"He was a little bigger than I remembered because they had fed him well. But then he was laying on my wife's feet, and I knew it was him … I was in disbelief. I know this dog is meant to be with our family." Chuck James, owner of Reckless

Reckless, who had been renamed Lucas, had arrived at the Monmouth County SPCA after the storm but hadn't yet been adopted. The shelter reported the reunion May 1.

Animal advocacy groups estimate that thousands of animals were lost or abandoned during Sandy. An estimated 250,000 pets were abandoned during Hurricane Katrina.

To help with evacuation, officials in New York allowed pets on public transportation and taxis ahead of the storm. The Humane Society also tweeted out pet-friendly storm shelters in NY, NJ, PA, DE, CT, VA, MD and Washington D.C. Copyright 2014 Reuters

To help with evacuation, officials in New York allowed pets on public transportation and taxis ahead of the storm. The Humane Society also tweeted out pet-friendly storm shelters in NY, NJ, PA, DE, CT, VA, MD and Washington D.C.

"It is so important that people evacuate with their pets… If your home isn't safe for you, it's not safe for your pet. Once you evacuate you never know when you will be back." Tim Rickey, ASPCA Senior Director

The ASPCA reported that all of NYC's 76 evacuation centers accepted pets. Some 400 animals were housed in New York and Long Island centers during the storm, according to the organization.

Experts said coastal bird species will likely face a long recovery following Sandy's destruction of many nesting areas in dunes, marshes and beaches along the East Coast. Copyright 2014 Reuters

Experts said coastal bird species will likely face a long recovery following Sandy's destruction of many nesting areas in dunes, marshes and beaches along the East Coast.

Read this storyline and more on Circa for iPhone

Now available in the App Store

What is Circa? Get the App