High school student discovers complete baby dinosaur fossil

U.S. -

When Kevin Terris was on a high school field trip in Utah, he made a find that is now the subject of a research paper.

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Source: dinosaurjoe.org
Source: dinosaurjoe.org
The find is the youngest and most complete specimen of a Parasaurolophus dinosaur. The specimen has been named 'Joe,' after Joe Augustyn, a contributor to the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology. Terris' find was the subject of a paper <a href="https://peerj.com/articles/182/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">recently published in the open access journal Peer</a>. Source: dinosaurjoe.org

The find is the youngest and most complete specimen of a Parasaurolophus dinosaur. The specimen has been named 'Joe,' after Joe Augustyn, a contributor to the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology. Terris' find was the subject of a paper recently published in the open access journal Peer.

"I decided to pop under it, and I looked up and saw a small bit of bone sticking out… Initially, it didn't look like too much. It looked like a rib, and ribs don't hold a whole lot of scientific value. … But then as we were walking away, we flipped over a bit of loose rock on the other end and found this skull just sitting there." Kevin Terris, paleontology student at Montana State University

After his find, researchers were able to carefully excavate the specimen and had it airlifted. It was eventually put on display at the Alf Museum. Terris was in high school when he made the discovery. He is now a student at Montana State University.

Parasaurolophus, a herbivore duck-billed dinosaur, lived about 75 million years in what is now western North America. CC BY-ND WikiCommons

Parasaurolophus, a herbivore duck-billed dinosaur, lived about 75 million years in what is now western North America.

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