Construction halted as seventh worker dies building Brazil World Cup stadium

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Construction and labor issues continue to plague Brazil's preparations for the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

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Copyright 2014 Reuters
Copyright 2014 Reuters

Arena Corinthians

The regional labor authority of Sao Paulo has ordered that construction at the Arena Corinthians stadium be halted pending a technical analysis of the project. Worker Fabio Hamilton da Cruz died after falling 25 feet while installing flooring. He is the third worker to die on the site.

Three of the twelve World Cup stadiums remain unfinished ahead of the tournament. The construction process has been plagued by structure failures and industrial accidents. Copyright 2014 Reuters

Three of the twelve World Cup stadiums remain unfinished ahead of the tournament. The construction process has been plagued by structure failures and industrial accidents.

Brazilian newspaper Folha de S.Paulo on April 4 reported that the Nov. 2013 crane collapse was probably caused by wet soil that had loosened up after a spate of heavy rain. The newspaper drew from an unpublished study by the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro that said the ground conditions weren't sufficient to support the crane.

FIFA secretary general Jerome Valcke said Jan. 21 that building work at Curitiba's Arena da Baixada stadium was seriously behind schedule, and that it would be removed as a host city for the 2014 World Cup if it did not speed up. The stadium was officially completed and opened March 29.

Reuters said on Feb. 15 that it had seen a previously non-public report prepared in Dec. 2013 by Brazil's Public Ministry on a World Cup stadium in Cuiaba which suffered a fire in Oct. 2013. An independent engineer found that the fire resulted in "structural damage... that could compromise the overall stability of the construction."

"It has been impossible to get good information to this point… We will make sure that no games occur [at the Arena Pantanal stadium] until the safety is completely guaranteed." Clovis de Almeida, Brazil Public Ministry prosecutor

It is unclear if the damage found by the engineer has been repaired at this point. Neither FIFA nor Brazil's Extraordinary Secretariat for the World Cup have said there has been structural damage to the stadium, but FIFA said it would "double check."

The Mane Garrincha stadium in Brasillia -- the most expensive of all the World Cup stadiums -- had a leaking roof, which became apparent during a women's game between Brazil and Chile held the weekend before Christmas. The local government said the builders will be required to pay for repairs. CC BY-ND WikiCommons

The Mane Garrincha stadium in Brasillia -- the most expensive of all the World Cup stadiums -- had a leaking roof, which became apparent during a women's game between Brazil and Chile held the weekend before Christmas. The local government said the builders will be required to pay for repairs.

Days after a construction worker fell 115 feet to his death, other workers building the stadium in Manaus walked off the job Dec. 16 over safety concerns. Local reports said a labor union representing the 1,800 workers halted construction because of government pressure to speed up the project.

Heavy rainwater caused part of the roof of the Fonte Nova stadium in Salvador, Brazil, to collapse on May 27, adding to the World Cup host nation's construction woes. It was repaired by mid-June.

While investigating construction work on Sao Paulo's airport, which is being expanded ahead of the 2014 World Cup, Brazil's labor ministry found 111 workers facing "slave-like conditions." Many were recruited from distant states and forced to live in makeshift camps while waiting to be formally hired.

Qatar, which will host the 2022 World Cup, has also been accused of allowing poor working conditions as it prepares for the event.

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